Where Do Camels Belong?


      Where Do Camels Belong?
Where do camels come from In the Arab world may seem the obvious answer But they are relative newcomers there They evolved in North America and retain their greatest diversity in South America, while the only wild dromedaries are in Australia.This is a classic example of the contradictions of native and invasive species, a hot issue right now as the flip side of biodiversity Do we need to fear invaders Can we control them Do we choose the right targets And are the natives always good guys Thompson puts forward a fascinating array of narratives to explore this crucial question. Download Where Do Camels Belong? by Ken Thompson – cricketworldcuplivestreaming.com

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      Where Do Camels Belong?
 PDF by Ken Thompson – cricketworldcuplivestreaming.com
  • Paperback
  • 262 pages
  • Where Do Camels Belong?
  • Ken Thompson
  • English
  • 12 June 2018
  • 1781251746

10 thoughts on “ Where Do Camels Belong?

  1. says:

    The subtitle of this book is The story and science of invasive species which I thought would be right up my alley having studied ecology and having worked briefly in biocontrol.A quick google of the author shows that he has extensive credentials in botany and ecology and so it was with high anticipation that I took this book home In it, the author draws upon his extensive experience to take us step by step on a...

  2. says:

    Some of the best popular science books are the ones that change your way of looking at something They might show you, for instance, that time travel is real, not just science fiction, or that quantum theory is not just for Nobel Prize winners or, in this case, that our whole attitude to invasive species is down to emotional knee jerk response, not to real science.Ken Thompson s fascinating and highly readable book takes us on a tour of the way that ecologists have made invasive species public Some of the best popular science books are the ones that change your way of looking at something They might show you, for instance, that time travel is real, not just science fiction, or that quantum theory is not just for Nobel Prize winners or, in this case, th...

  3. says:

    I think the book makes some valid points, but he cherry picked his examples It wouldn t be hard to come up withexamples of species doing serious economic eco system damage emerald ash borer, pine beetle, kudzu to name a few off the top of my head And why not go intodetail about solutions What s the ultimate goal in his estimation Preserve diversity Healthy Eco systems He pays lips service to other threats like climate change, habitat loss, and resource management with little a I think the book makes some valid points, but he cherry picked his examples It wouldn t be hard to come up withexamples of species doing serious economic eco system damage emerald ash borer, pine beetle, kudzu to name a few off the top of my head And why not go intodetail about solutions What s the ultimate goal in his estimation Preserve diversity Healthy Eco systems ...

  4. says:

    Good stuff Challenged my preconceptions, made me wish the author was here so I could ask follow up questions.

  5. says:

    What a fantastic book Thompson s work has challenged and changed all my views on species conservationism in such a dramatic view that I may need time to come to terms with it.It s serious and humourous, simple and complex, yet always enlightening I got thrilled about the reintroduction of lynx in the UK to save the species, but I wonder what I should do the next time my local rangers email me to remove rhododendron from my country park Should I join them Or should I tell them that rhododendro What a fantastic book Thompson s work has challenged and changed all my views on species conservationism in such a dramatic view that I may need time to come to terms with it.It s serious and hum...

  6. says:

    In the first few chapters of this book, I was moaning and rolling my eyes a lot of course nativeness is subjective of course ecology is value laden At first this book felt to me like one written by an ecologist who suddenly had these rather jarring revelations that what he d spent his career believing was objective and pure science was actually rather messy and complicated Of course that s the case, I thought, how could he have believed otherwise As I read on, and Thompson got to the real t In the first few chapters of this book, I was moaning and rolling my eyes a lot of course nativeness is subjective of course ecology is value laden At first this book felt to me like one written by an ecologist who suddenly had these rather jarring revelations that what he d spent his career believing was objective and pure science was actually rather messy and complicated Of course that s the case, I thought, how could he have believed otherwise As I read on, and Thompson got to the real thesis of the book, I realise...

  7. says:

    This book addresses the issue of the concept of native species versus invasive or alien species The author shows that the distinction is problematical and popular ideas of invasions and the need to address them are frequently flawed Many examples are given, most surprising Camels are his first illustration, having evolved in North America for 10 million years and migrated to South America and Asia before disappearing in NA around 8000 ya, making it unclear where they belong.Chapter 1 Speci This book addresses the issue of the concept of native species versus invasive or alien species The author shows that the distinction is problematical and popular ideas of invasions and the need to address them are frequently flawed Many examples are given, most surprising Camels are his first illustration, having evolved in North America for 10 million years and migrated to South America and Asia before disappearing in NA around 8000 ya, making it unclear where they belong.Chapter 1 Species On The Move reviews the movements of the continents and the resulting changes in distribution of plants and animals During glaciations, species retreat to warmer areas, then durin...

  8. says:

    This book is an extroverted ecologist at a party where the music is too loud and he s had a few too many wines.A defensive stream of consciousness Facts and scenarios piled onto the page Haphazard, repetitive, poorly organised, and poorly constructed It s just generally a bit of a ramble.There s some good stuff in here But he s peppered these case studies with distractions and side stories He s attempted some jokes and sarcasm So in the end I can t be sur...

  9. says:

    This book brings me to the end of a long road in which my thoughts about what is nature and how do we, as humans, deal with it, do a complete turn about It swims hard against the invasive aliens bad point of view that dominates how we think about and deal with our ecosystems The science isn t there, and our...

  10. says:

    Good and interesting read Is muchof an open critique of modern conservation theory and policy than an in depth review of the field Not sure if I believe everything he claims but I certainly understand and agree with many of his concerns Competently written for the most part.

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